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Feminism, Its Fallacies and Follies John Martin

Feminism, Its Fallacies and Follies

John Martin

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230312453
Paperback
80 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ... chapter viii the familyMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ... chapter viii the family and the servant Let Us define the servant as a person who performs, in a family, menial, personal services for no other motive than for wages. The servant, properly speaking, is a function of the family. A waitress in a restaurant, is not, for example, properly a servant. The governess, although she resides in the family and works for hire, is yet not a servant because her service is not menial. A maiden sister or aunt who resides in the family, who performs constantly menial, personal services, is trot a servant, because she does not work for hire. All of the conditions of the definition must be present before we have the servant. The social ancestor of the servant, the serf or the family slave, the handmaid or the bondwoman, was essentially a member of the family, sharing its good or ill-fortune. The modern servant is no longer one of the family. Among other reasons may be mentioned the fact that the average stay of the average servant in a place is said to be now only two weeks! It is inevitable that the servant and the family mutually jar- they belong to two different orders of society. The servant belongs to the commercial order- serving is her business, and the principle of business is to get as much and give as little as you can. In the family, mutual service is freely given. Towards the servant the house mother must, however, also apply commercial principles and get as much as she can for her money. Thus the commercial principle is introduced into the family--the spot of all the world which should remain uncontaminated by it. Therefore the healthy family instinctively resents the servant as an alien and perplexing influence. She interrupts family intercourse, disturbs family confidence, robs the family...