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History of the Penrose Family of Philadelphia Josiah Granville Leach

History of the Penrose Family of Philadelphia

Josiah Granville Leach

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230470320
Paperback
54 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...New York with the firstMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...New York with the first regiment above named, he married Anne Howard, daughter of Sheffield Howard, a merchant of that city. Upon the death of Major Bingham, his widow married for second husband, Sir Thomas Hay, which fact is thus recorded in Burkes Peerage: Sir Thomas Hay, eldest son of Alexander Hay, married, 27 Aug., 1703, Anne, widow of Major of the Revolution, and, in his early childhood, he was selected as one of two youthful standard-bearers to one of the first companies raised in Philadelphia, for that contest, which selection was made to evince that the enthusiasm and fervor of patriotism pervaded the young and the old, and extended to all ranks and conditions. Driven from Philadelphia when that city fell into the hands of the invading foe, he accompanied his widowed mother and an honored uncle Colonel Clement Biddle, an officer high in the confidence of the great chief who led our armies to battle, to the Valley Forge- and though but a child, witnessed and shared in the sufferings of that terrible winter--one of the most gloomy periods of the revolution. Mr. Penrose enjoyed the advantages of a liberal education, part of which he received in Europe, where he went, in 1788, with his mother, and stepfather, Rudolph Tillier. Returning to Philadelphia, he was commissioned by Governor Mifflin, ensign of a company of light infantry in the seventh battalion of the City and Liberties Militia, a fac-simile of which commission is herewith interleaved. In 1803, he was a candidate for Congress, on the Democratic-Republican ticket, but failed of an election. In 1805, he was commissioned by President Jefferson one of the Land Commissioners of the Louisiana Territory, and removed to St. Louis, then the head-quarters of that...